Tight neck or tight traps? Read on.

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In our last #muscleoftheday we have the Trapezius muscle, often referred to as the Trap.

 

It is a big and giant muscle and usually overdeveloped in many people. 

 

This muscle has a lot of jobs to do:

 

Retraction, superior rotation, elevation and depression of the shoulder.

 

In our current modern society we are in an epidemic of overdeveloped traps and many people wear them as a badge of being awesome. We often go “look at the traps on that guy, he must be super strong.”

 

I’m sure that guy or girl is super strong, but it is not a functional strong. Functional strong is the way to be.

 

So why are the traps so overdeveloped?

 

Because we spend the majority of our lives looking down at our phone, sitting in the worst postures ever and we need to get some stability from somewhere, so our body recruits the traps.

 

The problem here is that the traps aren't designed to really support the neck, but they lend a hand, but it leads to a ton of dysfunction.

 

So what does conventional wisdom tell us to do with these traps?

 

Roll them, stretch them, roll them and then stretch them some more!

 

Its a never-ending cycle and people just continue to think they just need to do more stretching because it’s so “tight.”

 

This is not what it needs! What it needs is a doctor who can figure out WHY the trap is getting overworked and get to the true cause of the dysfunction, not just trying to deal with the symptoms of what is going on.

 

The best doctors in the world are trained in the Integrative Diagnosis system and are experts at figuring out what is really going on!

Knee Pain or Meniscus tear? Check this muscle out.

In today’s #muscleoftheday we have the Vastus Medialis, better known as the VMO.   This muscle is one of the four muscles that make up the group called the quadriceps.   It’s main job is to extended the knee joint and it does a really good job at it. When it stays in its lane and does its job all is well.   So why is this muscle always considered a problem? Why do so many people think it isn’t “activating or firing” correctly?   Because most people don’t truly understand the role of the muscles and why the nervous system would “shut down” a particular muscle.   As I scroll my social media feeds all day I am flooded with a ton of wrong and inaccurate information from people who dub themselves as “experts” and think the solution to all injuries is to just get the muscle to fire or activate.   I really wish it was that simple, but people who believe that logic are not able to process the details, and most people are allergic to details.   I want to keep this post short and to the point:   The VMO isn’t firing or activating for a reason, and that reason is simple:   It is trying to take the load off some type of damaged structure, which is usually the knee cartilage.   So instead of basically thinking that you just need to get a muscle firing, maybe you should really ask the question of why this muscle isn't firing?   The doctors that can do that are thoroughly trained in biomechanics and function in the Integrative Diagnosis system. 

In today’s #muscleoftheday we have the Vastus Medialis, better known as the VMO.

 

This muscle is one of the four muscles that make up the group called the quadriceps.

 

It’s main job is to extended the knee joint and it does a really good job at it. When it stays in its lane and does its job all is well.

 

So why is this muscle always considered a problem? Why do so many people think it isn’t “activating or firing” correctly?

 

Because most people don’t truly understand the role of the muscles and why the nervous system would “shut down” a particular muscle.

 

As I scroll my social media feeds all day I am flooded with a ton of wrong and inaccurate information from people who dub themselves as “experts” and think the solution to all injuries is to just get the muscle to fire or activate.

 

I really wish it was that simple, but people who believe that logic are not able to process the details, and most people are allergic to details.

 

I want to keep this post short and to the point:

 

The VMO isn’t firing or activating for a reason, and that reason is simple:

 

It is trying to take the load off some type of damaged structure, which is usually the knee cartilage.

 

So instead of basically thinking that you just need to get a muscle firing, maybe you should really ask the question of why this muscle isn't firing?

 

The doctors that can do that are thoroughly trained in biomechanics and function in the Integrative Diagnosis system. 

IT band syndrome? Check this out.

In today’s #muscleoftheday we are focusing on the IT band. This muscle is so “important” that it also gets a syndrome named after it, IT Band Syndrome!   Must be pretty darn important, right?   Wrong!   There is so much wrong information and misconceptions regarding this area and it gets blamed way too much in leg and hip problems.   So lets clear up some information and help you get better informed.   The IT band itself isn't really even a muscle, its more of some fascia that runs down the side of the leg.   Have you ever found yourself in agonizing pain when you try to roll out and have this look of impending doom?   Only to suffer with agony and have to do the same thing the next day.   What gives?   The issue here is that the IT band is getting overworked because something else in the hip and leg isn’t working correctly.   What could it be?   1. Hamstring. 2. Adductor. 3. Low back dysfunction. 4. Posterior chain weakness.   All force must go somewhere when you are using muscles and when the above mentioned muscles and areas can’t get said force, they recruit other structures, especially the IT band.   We get in this never-ending cycle that if the area hurts it MUST be the problem. This is extremely detrimental in finding a full resolution for the problem.   We stretch, roll it, smash and get deep tissue work on it, all with temporary relief.   The problem is you need your issue assessed properly by a biomechanics specialist who can look at the area as a whole and see where the week links are in the chain.   I can confidently say if you have been diagnosed with IT band syndrome it isn’t even close to your problem and whoever gave it to you is wrong.   There are experts out there, but there aren’t a lot of them, if you are lucky enough you have a doctor trained in Integrative Diagnosis in your area

In today’s #muscleoftheday we are focusing on the IT band. This muscle is so “important” that it also gets a syndrome named after it, IT Band Syndrome!

 

Must be pretty darn important, right?

 

Wrong!

 

There is so much wrong information and misconceptions regarding this area and it gets blamed way too much in leg and hip problems.

 

So lets clear up some information and help you get better informed.

 

The IT band itself isn't really even a muscle, its more of some fascia that runs down the side of the leg.

 

Have you ever found yourself in agonizing pain when you try to roll out and have this look of impending doom?

 

Only to suffer with agony and have to do the same thing the next day.

 

What gives?

 

The issue here is that the IT band is getting overworked because something else in the hip and leg isn’t working correctly.

 

What could it be?

 

1. Hamstring.

2. Adductor.

3. Low back dysfunction.

4. Posterior chain weakness.

 

All force must go somewhere when you are using muscles and when the above mentioned muscles and areas can’t get said force, they recruit other structures, especially the IT band.

 

We get in this never-ending cycle that if the area hurts it MUST be the problem. This is extremely detrimental in finding a full resolution for the problem.

 

We stretch, roll it, smash and get deep tissue work on it, all with temporary relief.

 

The problem is you need your issue assessed properly by a biomechanics specialist who can look at the area as a whole and see where the week links are in the chain.

 

I can confidently say if you have been diagnosed with IT band syndrome it isn’t even close to your problem and whoever gave it to you is wrong.

 

There are experts out there, but there aren’t a lot of them, if you are lucky enough you have a doctor trained in Integrative Diagnosis in your area

Sciatica or Piriformis Syndrome? Maybe not....

In today’s #muscleoftheday we have the vastly over blamed muscle for a majority of what people consider hip of sciatica like pain, the piriformis muscle.   The muscle is so over blamed that it even has a syndrome named after it!   Piriformis Syndrome!   Anytime you hear a word with syndrome associated with it when it comes to musculoskeletal injuries you can automatically assume that it really means nothing and the person diagnosing you with it is guilty of any of the following:   1. They have to make up something to appease the insurance companies.    2. The person actually doesn't understand basic anatomy of the hip and muscles around it.   3. They were taught WRONG by someone else who also doesn't know basic anatomy,   We live in a world of what I call “point and assume” diagnosis. If it hurts in a particular area we point to it and make broad assumptions that it just has to be this muscle because thats where it hurts.   This type of thinking has actually steered people in the wrong direction and actually keeps them from getting an accurate diagnosis.   I myself have some pretty bad experience with what was called Piriformis Syndrome when I was in graduate school.   I was actually having an acute injury to my disc in my low back and was in a ton of pain. I was still relatively new in the school so I hobbled my way into the clinic. (Side note here I was doing some dumb stuff in the gym, but that’s a story for another time.)   I dragged myself into the clinic to see my student doctor, who was being oversaw by the clinic director.   I was “diagnosed” with Piriformis Syndrome and the student doctor proceeded to grind his elbow into my sciatic nerve and hip, very excruciating.   I felt good for 20 minutes, then I got worse!   Why did I get worse?   Because I didn't get the proper diagnosis, which led to the wrong treatment and more pain.   Take home:   There is a lot of value in getting a proper diagnosis for your problem and if you have just been given the one of Piriformis Syndrome or Sciatica you will be doomed.   Here are few real diagnosis of what could really be causing your “ Piriformis Syndrome”:   1. Lumbar Disc Injury. 2. Sciatic Nerve Entrapment with adhesion. 3. Hip degeneration.   Now those are real diagnoses and that can only come from a doctor who clearly knows what they are doing and the best in the world are trained in IntegrativeDiagnosis.

In today’s #muscleoftheday we have the vastly over blamed muscle for a majority of what people consider hip of sciatica like pain, the piriformis muscle.

 

The muscle is so over blamed that it even has a syndrome named after it!

 

Piriformis Syndrome!

 

Anytime you hear a word with syndrome associated with it when it comes to musculoskeletal injuries you can automatically assume that it really means nothing and the person diagnosing you with it is guilty of any of the following:

 

1. They have to make up something to appease the insurance companies. 

 

2. The person actually doesn't understand basic anatomy of the hip and muscles around it.

 

3. They were taught WRONG by someone else who also doesn't know basic anatomy,

 

We live in a world of what I call “point and assume” diagnosis. If it hurts in a particular area we point to it and make broad assumptions that it just has to be this muscle because thats where it hurts.

 

This type of thinking has actually steered people in the wrong direction and actually keeps them from getting an accurate diagnosis.

 

I myself have some pretty bad experience with what was called Piriformis Syndrome when I was in graduate school.

 

I was actually having an acute injury to my disc in my low back and was in a ton of pain. I was still relatively new in the school so I hobbled my way into the clinic. (Side note here I was doing some dumb stuff in the gym, but that’s a story for another time.)

 

I dragged myself into the clinic to see my student doctor, who was being oversaw by the clinic director.

 

I was “diagnosed” with Piriformis Syndrome and the student doctor proceeded to grind his elbow into my sciatic nerve and hip, very excruciating.

 

I felt good for 20 minutes, then I got worse!

 

Why did I get worse?

 

Because I didn't get the proper diagnosis, which led to the wrong treatment and more pain.

 

Take home:

 

There is a lot of value in getting a proper diagnosis for your problem and if you have just been given the one of Piriformis Syndrome or Sciatica you will be doomed.

 

Here are few real diagnosis of what could really be causing your “ Piriformis Syndrome”:

 

1. Lumbar Disc Injury.

2. Sciatic Nerve Entrapment with adhesion.

3. Hip degeneration.

 

Now those are real diagnoses and that can only come from a doctor who clearly knows what they are doing and the best in the world are trained in IntegrativeDiagnosis.

Disc injury or disc pain? Still hurting? Check this structure out.

In today’s muscle of the day we are continuing our series on low back pain and dysfunction, especially the structures that are involved in poor movement and injuries to the disc.   Up today we have the supraspinous ligament. This ligament sits on top of the spinous processes in the spine and is very important in the mechanics and movement of the lumbar spine.    This ligament becomes a problem when we have to spend a lot of time sitting in bad positions, which is the majority of anyone in a modern society.   When this happens it puts the ligament in a constant stretch and deprives it of oxygen and blood, leading to adhesion forming in the ligament.   Adhesion is like glue, it causes the ligament to become less flexible and weaker. The job of the ligament is to control movement of the bones and when it can’t it can alter the motion of the spine.   Altered motion is really bad, its similar to running your car with a bad alignment. The bad alignment can wear out your tires quicker and that is the same thing that happens to the disc when you have adhesion in the ligament.   The good news is that adhesion is completely reversible with expert treatment provided by a doctor certified in the #IntegrativeDiagnosis System.   Doctors trained in this system are movement specialists and experts in identifying problems that alter mechanics and movement in structures.    With their expert diagnosis and training they are able to get rid of adhesion, which will restore range of motion and take the pressure off the disc.   The basic take home is that don't ignore pain, when it comes and last for more than a few weeks get it figured out! Its a lot easier to treat it when its early instead of waiting until it blows up and hoping for a miracle.

In today’s muscle of the day we are continuing our series on low back pain and dysfunction, especially the structures that are involved in poor movement and injuries to the disc.

 

Up today we have the supraspinous ligament. This ligament sits on top of the spinous processes in the spine and is very important in the mechanics and movement of the lumbar spine. 

 

This ligament becomes a problem when we have to spend a lot of time sitting in bad positions, which is the majority of anyone in a modern society.

 

When this happens it puts the ligament in a constant stretch and deprives it of oxygen and blood, leading to adhesion forming in the ligament.

 

Adhesion is like glue, it causes the ligament to become less flexible and weaker. The job of the ligament is to control movement of the bones and when it can’t it can alter the motion of the spine.

 

Altered motion is really bad, its similar to running your car with a bad alignment. The bad alignment can wear out your tires quicker and that is the same thing that happens to the disc when you have adhesion in the ligament.

 

The good news is that adhesion is completely reversible with expert treatment provided by a doctor certified in the #IntegrativeDiagnosis System.

 

Doctors trained in this system are movement specialists and experts in identifying problems that alter mechanics and movement in structures. 

 

With their expert diagnosis and training they are able to get rid of adhesion, which will restore range of motion and take the pressure off the disc.

 

The basic take home is that don't ignore pain, when it comes and last for more than a few weeks get it figured out! Its a lot easier to treat it when its early instead of waiting until it blows up and hoping for a miracle.