Knee Pain or Meniscus tear? Check this muscle out.

In today’s #muscleoftheday we have the Vastus Medialis, better known as the VMO.   This muscle is one of the four muscles that make up the group called the quadriceps.   It’s main job is to extended the knee joint and it does a really good job at it. When it stays in its lane and does its job all is well.   So why is this muscle always considered a problem? Why do so many people think it isn’t “activating or firing” correctly?   Because most people don’t truly understand the role of the muscles and why the nervous system would “shut down” a particular muscle.   As I scroll my social media feeds all day I am flooded with a ton of wrong and inaccurate information from people who dub themselves as “experts” and think the solution to all injuries is to just get the muscle to fire or activate.   I really wish it was that simple, but people who believe that logic are not able to process the details, and most people are allergic to details.   I want to keep this post short and to the point:   The VMO isn’t firing or activating for a reason, and that reason is simple:   It is trying to take the load off some type of damaged structure, which is usually the knee cartilage.   So instead of basically thinking that you just need to get a muscle firing, maybe you should really ask the question of why this muscle isn't firing?   The doctors that can do that are thoroughly trained in biomechanics and function in the Integrative Diagnosis system. 

In today’s #muscleoftheday we have the Vastus Medialis, better known as the VMO.

 

This muscle is one of the four muscles that make up the group called the quadriceps.

 

It’s main job is to extended the knee joint and it does a really good job at it. When it stays in its lane and does its job all is well.

 

So why is this muscle always considered a problem? Why do so many people think it isn’t “activating or firing” correctly?

 

Because most people don’t truly understand the role of the muscles and why the nervous system would “shut down” a particular muscle.

 

As I scroll my social media feeds all day I am flooded with a ton of wrong and inaccurate information from people who dub themselves as “experts” and think the solution to all injuries is to just get the muscle to fire or activate.

 

I really wish it was that simple, but people who believe that logic are not able to process the details, and most people are allergic to details.

 

I want to keep this post short and to the point:

 

The VMO isn’t firing or activating for a reason, and that reason is simple:

 

It is trying to take the load off some type of damaged structure, which is usually the knee cartilage.

 

So instead of basically thinking that you just need to get a muscle firing, maybe you should really ask the question of why this muscle isn't firing?

 

The doctors that can do that are thoroughly trained in biomechanics and function in the Integrative Diagnosis system.