Could your low back be causing your knee pain?

We are continuing our series this week on knee pain and more specifically knee pain without any direct trauma.   As I said yesterday I see a lot of knee pain and dysfunction in my office, in 90 percent of those situations there is no actual trauma to the knee or specific mechanism of injury.   Most patients just say it really came out of nowhere and can't really pinpoint down what really cause it.   In the current medical model we spend over 5 billion dollars a year on knee treatments and surgery.   If you read the current data you will see that in many cases the knee surgeries have really lousy and poor outcomes.   So what gives on that?   The problem is that most practitioners become very symptom focused, thinking that if the knee hurts it must be the problem.   People end up under the knife everyday only to come back to the doctor a few months later and still have the pain.   So what is going on?   One problem leading to knee pain could actually be some dysfunction in the lower back, more specifically some degeneration to the disc and joint.   As you know the majority of us are stuck sitting all day. When this happens it puts a lot of tension and pressure on the muscles in our low back.   When this happens we develop what is called adhesion.   Adhesion is like glue that gets inside the muscle and makes it less flexible and weaker.   The other problem is that muscles can’t do their job of supporting the spine, which puts more wear and tear on the joint and disc.   In the picture above we show what poor dysfunction looks like in the top picture. That puts more pressure on the joint and disc, leading to a lot of dysfunction. All that space under the pencil shows us that there is very little movement in the spine, which creates a nutcracker effect on the disc. Definitely not good!   The picture below is what normal should look like good and healthy tissues.       So when you look like the above picture the body freaks out a bit and causes all the muscles around the back to engage in what is called protective tension to help keep the damage from getting worse.   One of the first muscles to kick on for protection is the hamstrings. They really try their best to lend a helping hand.   Unfortunately when this happens they can’t do their primary job to support the knee.   So if you have low back pain and a knee problem they are definitely correlated.    Tomorrow we will cover the role of the hamstrings in knee problems and stability, so stay tuned!

We are continuing our series this week on knee pain and more specifically knee pain without any direct trauma.

 

As I said yesterday I see a lot of knee pain and dysfunction in my office, in 90 percent of those situations there is no actual trauma to the knee or specific mechanism of injury.

 

Most patients just say it really came out of nowhere and can't really pinpoint down what really cause it.

 

In the current medical model we spend over 5 billion dollars a year on knee treatments and surgery.

 

If you read the current data you will see that in many cases the knee surgeries have really lousy and poor outcomes.

 

So what gives on that?

 

The problem is that most practitioners become very symptom focused, thinking that if the knee hurts it must be the problem.

 

People end up under the knife everyday only to come back to the doctor a few months later and still have the pain.

 

So what is going on?

 

One problem leading to knee pain could actually be some dysfunction in the lower back, more specifically some degeneration to the disc and joint.

 

As you know the majority of us are stuck sitting all day. When this happens it puts a lot of tension and pressure on the muscles in our low back.

 

When this happens we develop what is called adhesion.

 

Adhesion is like glue that gets inside the muscle and makes it less flexible and weaker.

 

The other problem is that muscles can’t do their job of supporting the spine, which puts more wear and tear on the joint and disc.

 

In the picture above we show what poor dysfunction looks like in the top picture. That puts more pressure on the joint and disc, leading to a lot of dysfunction. All that space under the pencil shows us that there is very little movement in the spine, which creates a nutcracker effect on the disc. Definitely not good!

 

The picture below is what normal should look like good and healthy tissues.

 

 

 

So when you look like the above picture the body freaks out a bit and causes all the muscles around the back to engage in what is called protective tension to help keep the damage from getting worse.

 

One of the first muscles to kick on for protection is the hamstrings. They really try their best to lend a helping hand.

 

Unfortunately when this happens they can’t do their primary job to support the knee.

 

So if you have low back pain and a knee problem they are definitely correlated. 

 

Tomorrow we will cover the role of the hamstrings in knee problems and stability, so stay tuned!