Hamstring dysfunction causing knee pain?

We are continuing our series this week on knee pain and more specifically knee pain without any direct trauma.   As I said yesterday I see a lot of knee pain and dysfunction in my office, in 90 percent of those situations there is no actual trauma to the knee or specific mechanism of injury.   Most patients just say it really came out of nowhere and can't really pinpoint down what really cause it.   In the current medical model we spend over 5 billion dollars a year on knee treatments and surgery.   If you read the current data you will see that in many cases the knee surgeries have really lousy and poor outcomes.   So what gives on that?   The problem is that most practitioners become very symptom focused, thinking that if the knee hurts it must be the problem.   People end up under the knife everyday only to come back to the doctor a few months later and still have the pain.   So what is going on?   One problem leading to knee pain could actually be some dysfunction in the hamstrings. The hamstrings end up doing a lot of work in the body and often can become weak from overuse.   Weak from overuse?!?   Shouldn't they be strong as all can be?   Not the case at all. When a muscle is constantly firing and trying to contract it can't get enough blood flow and oxygen to keep up with the demands, this leads to a lot of adhesion.   Adhesion makes the muscle weaker and less flexible.   As we said yesterday in our post about low back dysfunction causing the hamstrings to tighten up to protect the low back, putting more burden on the hamstrings.   The body sacrifices the hamstrings for the good on the low back because something very important lives in there, your spinal cord.   If this gets damaged then you don’t work, so the hamstring stops doing its normal job, which is to support the knee from the back.   Over time this causes the knee to slide and grind on it, causing meniscus damage and pain.   Most doctors just assume if the knee hurts that it must be the problem and usually on MRI it is confirmed that there is a tear.   They go in and fix the tear, but never figured out what caused it. A few months later you still have knee pain and they recommend shots or more surgery.   This is a really slippery slope and will really set you up for a lot more pain and dysfunction later in life.   My best advice is to get to a biomechanics specialist, if you are lucky they are trained in Integrative Diagnosis so they can get to the root cause of your problem.   The difference and expertise is in the details and most doctors are allergic to details and just trying to find a place to apply what they are trained in, instead of what you truly need.   Ask questions, demand better and if you don’t feel comfortable with what the doctor is saying/recommending then get multiple opinions!

We are continuing our series this week on knee pain and more specifically knee pain without any direct trauma.

 

As I said yesterday I see a lot of knee pain and dysfunction in my office, in 90 percent of those situations there is no actual trauma to the knee or specific mechanism of injury.

 

Most patients just say it really came out of nowhere and can't really pinpoint down what really cause it.

 

In the current medical model we spend over 5 billion dollars a year on knee treatments and surgery.

 

If you read the current data you will see that in many cases the knee surgeries have really lousy and poor outcomes.

 

So what gives on that?

 

The problem is that most practitioners become very symptom focused, thinking that if the knee hurts it must be the problem.

 

People end up under the knife everyday only to come back to the doctor a few months later and still have the pain.

 

So what is going on?

 

One problem leading to knee pain could actually be some dysfunction in the hamstrings. The hamstrings end up doing a lot of work in the body and often can become weak from overuse.

 

Weak from overuse?!?

 

Shouldn't they be strong as all can be?

 

Not the case at all. When a muscle is constantly firing and trying to contract it can't get enough blood flow and oxygen to keep up with the demands, this leads to a lot of adhesion.

 

Adhesion makes the muscle weaker and less flexible.

 

As we said yesterday in our post about low back dysfunction causing the hamstrings to tighten up to protect the low back, putting more burden on the hamstrings.

 

The body sacrifices the hamstrings for the good on the low back because something very important lives in there, your spinal cord.

 

If this gets damaged then you don’t work, so the hamstring stops doing its normal job, which is to support the knee from the back.

 

Over time this causes the knee to slide and grind on it, causing meniscus damage and pain.

 

Most doctors just assume if the knee hurts that it must be the problem and usually on MRI it is confirmed that there is a tear.

 

They go in and fix the tear, but never figured out what caused it. A few months later you still have knee pain and they recommend shots or more surgery.

 

This is a really slippery slope and will really set you up for a lot more pain and dysfunction later in life.

 

My best advice is to get to a biomechanics specialist, if you are lucky they are trained in Integrative Diagnosis so they can get to the root cause of your problem.

 

The difference and expertise is in the details and most doctors are allergic to details and just trying to find a place to apply what they are trained in, instead of what you truly need.

 

Ask questions, demand better and if you don’t feel comfortable with what the doctor is saying/recommending then get multiple opinions!