Rotator Cuff Injury Treatments: Infraspinatus Muscle

In today’s muscle of theday we have one of the very important muscles of the shoulder called the Infrapspinatus.    This muscle is usually the first one to get dysfunctional in any type of shoulder injury.   It’s main job is to actually create some stability in the shoulder joint itself and secondary it is a mover of the shoulder in what is called external rotation.   Adhesion in this muscle is very common and especially in people that do a lot of overhead work or pressing.   Another way this muscle gets overused is during periods of bad posture, especially sitting at a desk all day long.   I think we know a lot of people that fall into that category in modern society!   The problem with having adhesion in this muscle is that the force has to go somewhere else in the body, usually to other areas of the rotator cuff or cartilage.   This leads to more force being put on the muscle and cause some major problems in shoulder dysfunction.   If adhesion goes unchecked for too long it can lead to bigger problems down the road that you don't want to have, such as shoulder surgery and pain.   Adhesion is always reversible with the right kind of treatment and the best doctors in the world are trained the integrative diagnosis system. These are the best in the world at finding and fixing adhesion!   The last issue here is that a lot of wrong information is out there regarding how to treat adhesion and it can actually lead to more problems down the road.   This muscle isn't that deep and when you try to treat it with a lacrosse ball or an instrument you actually do more harm than good.   Removing adhesion is an art and takes an expert to do so.   They are many pretenders out there, but very few are actually removing adhesion effectively.       

In today’s muscle of theday we have one of the very important muscles of the shoulder called the Infrapspinatus. 

 

This muscle is usually the first one to get dysfunctional in any type of shoulder injury.

 

It’s main job is to actually create some stability in the shoulder joint itself and secondary it is a mover of the shoulder in what is called external rotation.

 

Adhesion in this muscle is very common and especially in people that do a lot of overhead work or pressing.

 

Another way this muscle gets overused is during periods of bad posture, especially sitting at a desk all day long.

 

I think we know a lot of people that fall into that category in modern society!

 

The problem with having adhesion in this muscle is that the force has to go somewhere else in the body, usually to other areas of the rotator cuff or cartilage.

 

This leads to more force being put on the muscle and cause some major problems in shoulder dysfunction.

 

If adhesion goes unchecked for too long it can lead to bigger problems down the road that you don't want to have, such as shoulder surgery and pain.

 

Adhesion is always reversible with the right kind of treatment and the best doctors in the world are trained the integrative diagnosis system. These are the best in the world at finding and fixing adhesion!

 

The last issue here is that a lot of wrong information is out there regarding how to treat adhesion and it can actually lead to more problems down the road.

 

This muscle isn't that deep and when you try to treat it with a lacrosse ball or an instrument you actually do more harm than good.

 

Removing adhesion is an art and takes an expert to do so.

 

They are many pretenders out there, but very few are actually removing adhesion effectively.