Shoulder pain or injury? Try this test.

In today’s muscle of the day we don’t have a normal muscle, what we actually have is a functional test for the shoulder.   This test is called shoulder abduction.   Essentially what you are doing is just moving your arms through space and trying to get your biceps to easily touch your head.   It should never be a struggle or difficult, and with a healthy shoulder it really should just float right up there.    Another key component of this test is that there should be no pain associated with it. This is a great test of the overall function and health of the shoulder in general.   A lot of people worry about other motions of the shoulder, such as internal and external rotation.   Those movements are important, but if you don’t have proper shoulder abduction then all the other movements really don’t matter.   In this test we are able to assess the function and health of the rotator cuff muscles. When people think of rotator cuff they automatically assume it is all about movement.   Movement is one of the functions of the rotator cuff, but the real job of it is to provide stability to the joint during any use.   The main muscles that are being tested here are the following:   Infraspinatus   Teres Minor   Subscapularis   These are the bread and butter of shoulder function and issues in the shoulder are usually a result of dysfunction in these muscles.   That dysfunction is usually an overuse type of problem, which creates adhesion.   Adhesion causes pain, weakness and decreased range of motion.   Adhesion also puts more pressure on the cartilage, joints and tendons.   Can you do this test pain free and for full range?   If not it might be time to admit you have a shoulder problem!   Stay tuned all week as we are going to go more in depth about the above muscles and their role in shoulder pain and dysfunction.

In today’s muscle of the day we don’t have a normal muscle, what we actually have is a functional test for the shoulder.

 

This test is called shoulder abduction.

 

Essentially what you are doing is just moving your arms through space and trying to get your biceps to easily touch your head.

 

It should never be a struggle or difficult, and with a healthy shoulder it really should just float right up there. 

 

Another key component of this test is that there should be no pain associated with it. This is a great test of the overall function and health of the shoulder in general.

 

A lot of people worry about other motions of the shoulder, such as internal and external rotation.

 

Those movements are important, but if you don’t have proper shoulder abduction then all the other movements really don’t matter.

 

In this test we are able to assess the function and health of the rotator cuff muscles. When people think of rotator cuff they automatically assume it is all about movement.

 

Movement is one of the functions of the rotator cuff, but the real job of it is to provide stability to the joint during any use.

 

The main muscles that are being tested here are the following:

 

Infraspinatus

 

Teres Minor

 

Subscapularis

 

These are the bread and butter of shoulder function and issues in the shoulder are usually a result of dysfunction in these muscles.

 

That dysfunction is usually an overuse type of problem, which creates adhesion.

 

Adhesion causes pain, weakness and decreased range of motion.

 

Adhesion also puts more pressure on the cartilage, joints and tendons.

 

Can you do this test pain free and for full range?

 

If not it might be time to admit you have a shoulder problem!

 

Stay tuned all week as we are going to go more in depth about the above muscles and their role in shoulder pain and dysfunction.