Shoulder pain with movement? Check this muscle.

 In today’s muscle of the day we have another one of the rotator cuff muscles, this one is the only muscle that actually stabilizes the shoulder from the front and it is a very important one in shoulder function and stability.     That muscle is the Subscapularis.     This muscle sits on the front of the shoulder blade and is deep to the pec muscle.     It is often loaded up with adhesion in people that do a lot of pressing, overhead work or sit all day with rounded shoulders.     Successful treatment of this muscle is critical in restoring normal range of motion to the shoulder and proper stability.     95 percent of practitioners who try to treat this muscle actually do a really poor job.     In many situations they aren't even on the muscle and actually treating the lat or teres major muscle.     Most patients cringe when you say you need to treat this muscle as they have flashbacks of how bad it hurt from other people treating it incorrectly.     This muscle is not that deep and does not need to be crushed. If an expert is treating it should be a bit uncomfortable, but nothing excruciating.     If it hurts like crazy then most likely the practitioner is too compressive or pulling the skin, which will not be effective treatment.     Treatment should never be excruciating, at worst it should be a “hurts but good.”     Good treatment is always necessary to fully resolve your problem and deeper and harder isn’t always the answer.

In today’s muscle of the day we have another one of the rotator cuff muscles, this one is the only muscle that actually stabilizes the shoulder from the front and it is a very important one in shoulder function and stability.

 

That muscle is the Subscapularis.

 

This muscle sits on the front of the shoulder blade and is deep to the pec muscle.

 

It is often loaded up with adhesion in people that do a lot of pressing, overhead work or sit all day with rounded shoulders.

 

Successful treatment of this muscle is critical in restoring normal range of motion to the shoulder and proper stability.

 

95 percent of practitioners who try to treat this muscle actually do a really poor job.

 

In many situations they aren't even on the muscle and actually treating the lat or teres major muscle.

 

Most patients cringe when you say you need to treat this muscle as they have flashbacks of how bad it hurt from other people treating it incorrectly.

 

This muscle is not that deep and does not need to be crushed. If an expert is treating it should be a bit uncomfortable, but nothing excruciating.

 

If it hurts like crazy then most likely the practitioner is too compressive or pulling the skin, which will not be effective treatment.

 

Treatment should never be excruciating, at worst it should be a “hurts but good.”

 

Good treatment is always necessary to fully resolve your problem and deeper and harder isn’t always the answer.